Free read Nervous Conditions ñ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB

Free read Nervous Conditions

Free read Nervous Conditions ñ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Ñ Tambu an adolescent girl who yearns to be free of the constraints of her rural village thinks her dreams have come true when her wealthy uncle offers to sponsor her schooling But she soon learns that the education she receives at his mission school comes with a priceNg to reconcile her divided loyalties A compassionate witness to her cousin's struggle and a sensitive observer of the women in her village Tambu narrates their world with compelling insight and veraci. We first meet Tambudzai or Tambu as she is commonly called as she talks about her brother I was not sorry when my brother died Nor am I apologising for my callousness my lack of feeling For it is not that at all I feel many things these days much than I was able to feel in the days when I was young and my brother died and there are reasons for this than the mere conseuences of age p 1From this opening introducing us to thirteen year old Tambu we enter the world of a young girl on the brink of becoming a young woman in a patriarchal African society of the late 1960s not far removed from colonial times where she and all of the women around her nervously await the decisions of the highest male in the family as to their future For Tambu wants to go to school But her older brother her only brother will be the one educated for she is after all femaleThus part of the meaning of the opening sentence Would she now have a chance Tambu speaks to the reader of all she encounters at home in the run down homestead of her dreams of an education at the Mission School the reality of her extended family as she begins to understand the hierarchical structures around her and where she fits or doesn't The family patriarch her uncle seems god like to her with his English education and degrees and power at the school He is the family decision makerLife is full of uestions that can't be asked and answers that are elusive All Tambu knows is that she loves learning and striving for something beyond what she has had And as she slowly grasps and understanding of her place she sees that she is just one of the many women she knows who are struggling with life that the usual goals of a little learning and early marriage are not her goals How can I describe the sensations that swamped me when Babamukuru started his car with me in the front seat beside him on the day I left home It was relief but than that It was than excitement and anticipation What I experienced that day was a short cut a rerouting of everything I had ever defined as me into fast lanes that would speedily lead me to my destination There was no room for what I left behind My father as affably shallowly agreeable as ever was insignificant My mother my anxious mother was no than another piece of surplus scenery to be maintained of course to be maintained but all the same superfluous an obstacle in the path of my departure p 58Tambu is ready to leave it all behind for the shining world ahead But this new world holds a multitude of everyday complexities that add to her nervousness 'Sit down my child' invited Babamukuru cordially as I tiptoed into the living room Actually I walked in normally placing my whole foot on the floor but it felt like tiptoeing so respectful was my gait 'On the seat my child on the seat' he added as I sank humbly to the carpet in the corner next to the doorway I stood up but hesitated not knowing where to sit It was a complex problem Babamukuru was sitting in his armchairwhile Maiguru sat at one end of the sofa There was room on the sofa between Maiguru and Babmukuru's chair as well as an unoccupied armchair beside Babamukuru but I could not take those seats since it would not do to sit so disrespectfully close to my uncle p 87Thankfully there was another chair The levels of behavior Tambu worked to maintain every day were part of the general nervous condition that builds higher in some than in others Some women are seen striving for independence in small individual ways while others may break under an unrelenting system She slowly begins to see that women around her even the highly educated Maiguru lose out in this system 'Your uncle wouldn't be able to do half the things he does if I didn't work as well' 'You must earn a lot of money' I breathed in awe My aunt laughed and said she never received her salary I was aghast 'What happens to your money The money that you earn Does the government take it' 'You could say that' my aunt laughed forcing herself to be merry again but not succeeding 'What it isto have to choose between self and security When I was in England I glimpsed for a little while the things I could have been the things I could have done if if if things were different But there was Babawa Chido and the children and the family As for me no one even thinks about the things I gave up' p 103Tambu is observing relationships and realities especially that between men and women and coming to the realization that women all around her and herself included were victims of the male's assumed superiority The victimisation I saw was universal It didn't depend on poverty on lack of education or on tradition It didn't depend on any of the things I had thought it depended on Men took it everywhere with them Even heroes like Babamukuru did it And that was the problem what I didn't like was the way all the conflicts came back to this uestion of femaleness Femaleness as opposed and inferior to maleness p 118This is an exciting book to read and an important book too highlighting as it does important social issues of a country I wish to understand better while also dealing with human issues that affect us all Using the coming of age form Dangarembga has created a novel that reveals teaches and inspires It has become a classic in Africa and really should be well known world wideInitially rated 4 to 45 but now after thinking about the book as I wrote I am changing the rating to 5

Read í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Ì Tsitsi Dangarembga

He education she receives at his mission school comes with a price There she meets her British educated cousin the worldly and rebellious Nyasha who is chafing under her father's authority and struggli. This was voted as one of the best African books of the twentieth century Written in the late 1980s it is set in what was then Rhodesia and is now Zimbabwe in the 1960s and 1970s It is actually the first of a trilogy; the third part of which has just been published this year This Mournable Body it has been longlisted for the Booker Prize Dangarembga has also just been arrested for protesting against corruption in Zimbabwe This novel is partly autobiographical The title is taken from Sartre’s introduction to Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth Colonialism poverty and gender are the key themes in the novel The main protagonist is a young girl called Tambu She only gets to go to school because her older brother has died As the male child he was the one to be educated The opening sentence “I was not sorry when my brother died” grabs the attention of the reader Tambu leaves her own home and parents to live with her uncle Babamukuru and his family at a mission station where she goes to school Her relationship with her cousin Nyasha is central in showing a different set of issues relating to gender and oppression Men and women have their place and the novel focusses on the different reactions of the various female characters The clash of cultures particularly affects Nyasha She has spent some time in England and is struggling with her African identity and her father’s very traditional concept of what she should be As she says to Tambu “I’m not one of them but I’m not one of you” Tambu comes to her own conclusions“The victimisation I saw was universal It didn’t depend on poverty on lack on education or on tradition It didn’t depend on any of the things I had thought it depended on Men took it everywhere with them Even heroes like Babamukuru did it And that was the problem But was I didn’t like was the way all the conflicts came back to this uestion of femaleness Femaleness as opposed and inferior to maleness”Tambu’s mother sees things in a different way and resents the way her children are taken from her to be educated and are not available to help with the housework and crops“And these days it is worse with the poverty of blackness on one side and the weight of womanhood on the other Aiwa What will help you my child is to learn to carry your burdens with strength”Tambu herself does well at her studies and wins a scholarship to a mostly white college run by nuns “For was I – I Tambudzai lately of the mission and before that the homestead – was I Tambudzai so recently a peasant was I not entering as I had promised myself I would a world where burdens lightened with every step soon to disappear altogether I had an idea that this would happen as I passed through the school gates those gates that would declare me a young lady a member of the Young Ladies College of the Sacred Heart I was impatient to get to those gates”Although at the very end of the novel Tambu is reassessing her views“For I was beginning to have a suspicion no than the seed of a suspicion that I had been too eager to leave the homestead and embrace the ‘Englishness’ of the mission; and after that the concentrated ‘Englishness’ of Sacred Heart The suspicion remained for a few days during which time it transformed itself into guilt and then I had nightmares”Nyasha is the one who sees things clearly as she battles with an eating disorder and rebels against her parents“It’s not their fault They did it to them too You know they did’ she whispered ‘To both of them but especially to him They put him through it all But it’s not his fault he’s good’ Her voice took on a Rhodesian accent ‘He’s a good boy a good munt A bloody good kaffir’ she informed in sneering sarcastic tones Then she was whispering again ‘Why do they do it Tambu’ she hissed bitterly her face contorting with rage ‘to me and to you and to him Do you see what they’ve done They’ve taken us away”This is a very good coming of age story with strong characters all of whom are well rounded and human with their own faults The real villains are colonialism and patriarchy Tambu’s journey is telling and I think I will be reading the rest of the trilogy

Tsitsi Dangarembga Ì 6 Read

Nervous ConditionsTambu an adolescent girl who yearns to be free of the constraints of her rural village thinks her dreams have come true when her wealthy uncle offers to sponsor her schooling But she soon learns that t. uietly unobtrusively and extremely fitfully something in my mind began to assert itself to uestion things and refuse to be brainwashed bringing me to this time when I can set down this story It was a long process for me that process of expansion Thus ends the novel which started with the narrator's confession that she was not sorry when her brother died The painful process of expansion which made Tambu's story possible was blocked for many years blocked by the patriarchal system which provided education for men and exploited women's physical labour at homeWhen her brother dies Tambu is allowed reluctantly to take his place Brainwashed to believe in her own inferiority she enters the world of education at her godlike patriarchal uncle's mission school and she defers to his charismatic omnipotent rule But as she gets closer to her cousin Nyasha she realises that there are other ways to perceive the world once you have a comparison and a choice And she sees the power of women underneath the rule of ridiculously pompous men And recognising one's own strength is the first step to shake off injusticeThe victimisation I saw was universal It didn't depend on poverty on lack of education or on tradition It didn't depend on any of the things I had thought it depended on Men took it everywhere with them But what I didn't like was the way all the conflicts came back to this uestion of femaleness Femaleness as opposed to and inferior to malenessTambu would have been surprised to discover how universal it REALLY is that conflict she hates It goes beyond the uestion of race and colonialism and Christian versus tribe rites You find it in highly educated modern and over privileged families in liberal democracies Men take it everywhere with themBut of course the situation is extreme if you are a young sensible and gifted girl in the clashing worlds of Christian bigotry and tribal patriarchy As a woman you are barely human And you have to learn to play your cards well to survive in a society designed for and by men You have to know which fights to pick and which ones to drop for your own safety Tambu and Nyasha learn to navigate the dominance of maleness and whiteness while they grow up side by side but it is not without major sacrifices Tambu has to let go of her broken mother and force her own way in order to make a change for herself Nyasha a hybrid schooled in England fights for her right to be an eual to men and almost dies in the process while taking out the punishment on herself as she develops bulimia and anorexia only to be told by a white psychiatrist that Africans don't have that kind of illnessThe two girls support each other with the help of their female relatives and encourage each other to stay on the path of searching for their own identity rather than to assimilate with Christian or tribal oppression In the most difficult times education is not only a means to reach independence but also a soothing medicine for repeatedly broken hearts and willsMost importantly most wonderfully there was the library big bright walled in glassThis novel should be reuired reading for the #metoo generation It is as powerful as Things Fall Apart but it adds the experience of the hidden world of women An inspiration on so many levels I strongly recommend it to the world of today