PDF ´ BOOK The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt Oxford Illustrated Histories FREE Ö IAN SHAW

Ian Shaw ✓ The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt Oxford Illustrated Histories PDF

PDF ´ BOOK The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt Oxford Illustrated Histories FREE Ö IAN SHAW ↠ Blending vividly written essays and over a hundred attractive illustrations including 32 color plates The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt is a stunningly designed and authoritative accOlogical research as they chart the principal political events of Egyptian history from the rise of the Pharaohs and the conuest of Egypt by Alexander the Great to the ascension of the Ptolemies and the coming of Roman legions The book also includes the first detailed examinations of three periods which were previously regarded as dark ages Against the backdrop of the birth and death of ruling dynasties the writers also examine cultural and social patterns including stylistic developments in art and litera Serious history book works great as a reference A hard slog if you read it cover to cover and you are relatively new to digging around Ancient Egypt As expected the chapters that deal with recent times were interesting particularly the sections that reference the intersection of Ancient Egypt with peoples of the Bible Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome I would have enjoyed pictures of the architecture and art that are referenced in the text; perhaps the hardcover has these

DOC ì The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt Oxford Illustrated Histories ✓ Ian Shaw

Blending vividly written essays and over a hundred attractive illustrations including 32 color plates The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt is a stunningly designed and authoritative account of the once glorious civilization on the Nile Ranging from 700000 BC to 311 AD this volume portrays the emergence and development of Egypt from its prehistoric roots to its conuest by the Roman Empire The contributors all leading scholars working at the cutting edge of Egyptology incorporate the latest findings in archae This was the go to book throughout my undergraduate degree in Egyptology one that I consulted times than I can recall for preparatory class reading source for essays prompt for presentations etc And yet my knowledge of it was patchy because I consulted as needed – with so many different demands on my time I never got to sit down with it and read the whole thing cover to cover; something which I looked to rectify this year Having done so I can heartily recommend itLet’s go through the negatives first Yes the print is rather small Fortunately I was reading on kindle but even the ability to increase the size of text does nothing to clarify the tiny maps It wasn’t too bad a fault for me partly because I knew most of the sites referred to partly because it was easy enough to consult a map online But I can understand how this would deter people Throughout the text I only spotted two major inaccuracies There may be that I simply didn’t pick up on or because new discoveries can change the picture all the time; the edition I read is the most recent available one from 2004 The errors were that the book stated that the last monarch of the 6th Dynasty was ueen Nitiret – this is a much later misunderstanding by classical authors writing about ancient Egypt some two thousand years removed and we now know that the monarch’s name was actually Netjerkare Siptah I and a king not a ueen The second error was that David Peacock in the final chapter states that the Red Sea trade port of Berenike established by Ptolemy II was named after his sister – it wasn’t for he had no such sister; it was named after his mother of that nameAnother criticism which pops up in reviews is the dryness of the text but I consider that a neutral aspect of the book heavily dependent on the experience and interest of the reader If you have come to this book with no prior knowledge of ancient Egypt whatsoever and no experience of academic non fictions you may find the book a challenge It is uite long and if not comprehensive certainly thorough in taking its readers from the dawn of Egyptian history right up to its incorporation into the Roman empire chock full of in depth analysis about state administration religious nuance and political shifts in agenda and execution If you’re a newcomer I would direct you away from this book and to Ian Shaw’s Ancient Egypt A Very Brief Introduction instead – shorter much accessible and written specifically for the general audienceHowever I have to admit that I didn’t think the book was that dry It was dense in material to be sure but it was written in a smooth fluid style throughout that I personally found to be far engaging and understandable than some of the other general histories of ancient Egypt I’ve been reading lately Despite the fact that this book like those others is written in the format of each chapter submitted by a different author and then edited by Ian Shaw there’s a consistency of style here that makes me think that Shaw curated each chapter with care for tone and accessibility This book succeeded far than others at holding my interest and getting across its important points In comparison to other similar books I also felt this book got less bogged down in numbers and statistics It didn’t hurt either that this book was accurate and made less factual errors than either Toby Wilkinson’s The Egyptian World or Marc van de Mieroop’s A History of Ancient EgyptUntil or unless I find a better academic overview of ancient Egypt than this one I have to say this is my recommended go to book10 out of 10

EBOOK The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt Oxford Illustrated Histories

The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt Oxford Illustrated HistoriesTure monumental architecture funerary beliefs and much The contributors illuminate the underlying patterns of social and political change and describe the changing face of ancient Egypt from the biographical details of individuals to the social and economic factors that shaped the lives of the people as a whole The only up to date single volume history of ancient Egypt available in English The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt is a must read for everyone interested in one of the great civilizations of antiui This is a really excellent collaborative history of Ancient Egypt—though dense and detailed enough that it's probably only for the serious Egyptophile or the aspiring student It runs from the Palaeolithic era right through to the post Ptolemaic period which is an enormous time frame but Shaw and the other contributors do a good job of addressing all the main developments and key events—the only real disappointment is the chapter on the Amarna period which fails to be as comprehensive as the others Aesthetically it's well put together with plenty of black and white and coloured plates maps time lines and genealogical charts Definitely recommended