Ebook à The Graveyard Book 307 pages Ä Reflectionslisburnltd


Mobi The Graveyard Book

Ebook à The Graveyard Book 307 pages Ä Reflectionslisburnltd ¸ Nobody Owens known to his friends as Bod is a perfectly normal boy Well he would be perfectly normal if he didn't live in a graveyard being raised and educated by ghosts with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor tNor the world of the deadThere are dangers and adventures for Bod in the graveyard the strange and terrible menace of the Sleer; a gravestone entrance to a desert that leads to the city of ghouls; friendship with a witch and so much But it I’ve noticed that there’s been an increased interest in the macabre in children’s literature lately Sometimes when I’ve had a glass or two of wine and I’m in a contemplative mood I try weaving together a postulation that ties the current love of violent movies into this rise in children’s literary darkness Is the violence of the world today trickling down into our entertainment Hogwash and poppycock and other words of scoff and denial says sober I But I’ve certainly seen a distinct rise in the Gothic and otherworldly over the last few years and one wonders if it’s because kids want of that kind of stuff or publishers are merely getting less sueamish All that aside generally I’ll read a May Bird book or an Everlost title and they’ll be fun examinations of the hereafter but not the kind of things that touch my heart Great writing doesn’t have to transcend its genre It just has to be emotionally honest with the reader And The Graveyard Book is one of the most emotionally honest books I’ve yet to have read this year Smart and focused touching and wry it takes the story of a boy raised by ghosts and extends it beyond the restrictive borders of the setting Great stuffIt starts with three murders There were supposed to be four The man Jack was one of the best maybe THE best and how hard is it to kill a toddler anyway But on that particular night the little boy went for a midnight toddle out the front door while the murderer was busy and straight into the nearby graveyard Saved and protected by the denizens of that particular abode the ghosts and the far corporeal if mysterious Silas the little boy is called Bod short for Nobody because no one knows his name As he grows older Bod learns the secrets of the graveyard though he has to be careful The man or is it “men” who killed his family could come back for him Best to stay uiet and out of sight Yet as Bod grows older it becomes clear that hiding may not be the best way to confront his enemies And what’s Bod must come to grips with what it means to grow up Can I level with you You know Coraline Mr Gaiman’s previous foray into middle grade children’s literature Come close now I don’t want to speak too loudly Uh I didn’t much care for it WAIT Come back come back I didn’t mean it Well maybe I did a tad It was a nice book A sufficient story But it was very much new category alert an adult author to children’s author first timer title Gaiman appeared to be finding his sealegs with Coraline He took the old Alice in Wonderland trope which adult authors naturally gravitate to on their first tries see Un Lun Dun Summerland The King in the Window etc Throw in some rats bees and buttons and voila Instant success But Coraline for all its readability and charm didn’t get me here thumps chest I didn’t feel emotionally close to the material Now why it should be that I’d feel closer emotionally to a book filled with a plethora of ghosts ghouls night gaunts and Hounds of God I can only chalk up to The Graveyard Book's strong vision My husband likes to say that the whole reason Buffy the Vampire Slayer worked as a television show was that it was a natural metaphor for the high school and eventually college experience Likewise The Graveyard Book has this strongstrange wonderful metaphor about kids growing up learning about the wider world and exploring beyond the safe boundaries of their homes There's so much you can read into this book I mean aren’t all adults just ghosts to kids anyway Those funny talking people whose time has passed but that may provide some shelter and wisdom against the wider crueler world Plus Mr Gaiman also includes characters in Bod's world that kids will wish they had in their own Silas a man who may be a vampire though the word is never said is every child's fantasy; A mysteriousmagical guardianfriend who will tell you the truth when your parents will not One thing I particularly liked about the book was the fact that Bod makes uite a few careless or thoughtless mistakes and yet you don’t feel particularly inclined to throttle him because of them Too often in a work of fiction a person isn’t properly put into the head of their protagonist So when that character walks off and does something stupid there’s the sense sometimes faint sometimes not that they deserved it and you’re not going to stick around and read about somebody that dumb are you But even when Bod is at his most intolerable his most childishly selfish and single minded you can understand and sympathize with him Bod is no brat a fact that implies right there that he is someone worth rooting for We see our own young selves in Bod and we root for him as a result And as Bod reaches each stage in his growth he encounters experiences and personalities that help him to reach maturity That’s a lot to put on the plate of a l’il ole fantasy novel particularly one that’s appropriate for younger kids And it is appropriate too Don’t let the fact that the first sentence in the book “There was a hand in the darkness and it held a knife” put you off The murder of Bod’s family is swift immediate and off screen What remains is just a great fantasy novel that has the potential to appeal to both boy and girl readers Kid wants a ghost story Check Kid wants a fantasy novel set in another world appropriate for Harry Potter fans Check Kid wants a “good book” That’s my favorite reuest When the eleven year old comes up to my desk and begs for “a good book” I can just show them the cover and the title of this puppy and feel zero guilt when their little eyes light up A good book it is I guess that if I have any objections at all to the title it has something to do with the villains They’re a bit sketchy which I suppose is the point but we live in an era where children’s fantasy novels spend oodles of time defining their antagonists’ motivations and histories Gaiman’s interested in his hero which is natural but the villains’ raison d’être is just a bit too vague for the average reader Honestly if it weren’t for the fact that Bod’s family is slaughtered at the start of this tale you wouldn’t necessarily know whether or not to believe that these people are as nasty as we've been told That said the book’s a peach I once heard someone postulate that maybe Neil Gaiman wrote it just so that he could play with the sentence “It takes a graveyard to raise a child” Unlikely Fun but unlikely I mean he does make a casual allusion that isn’t far off from that phrase but he never goes whole hog This book doesn’t feel like it was written to back up a joke It feels like a book written by a parent with children growing up and moving out It’s a title that tips its hat to kids making their way in the world their pasts behind them their futures unknown This is not yet another silly little fantasy novel but something with weight and depth The fact that it just happens to be loads of fun to boot is simply a nice bonus Highly recommendedAges 10 and up

The Graveyard BookNor the world of the deadThere are dangers and adventures for Bod in the graveyard the strange and terrible menace of the Sleer; a gravestone entrance to a desert that leads to the city of ghouls; friendship with a witch and so much But it I’ve noticed that there’s been an increased interest in the macabre in children’s literature lately Sometimes when I’ve had a glass or two of wine and I’m in a contemplative mood I try weaving together a postulation that ties the current love of violent movies into this rise in children’s literary darkness Is the violence of the world today trickling down into our entertainment Hogwash and poppycock and other words of scoff and denial says sober I But I’ve certainly seen a distinct rise in the Gothic and otherworldly over the last few years and one wonders if it’s because kids want of that kind of stuff or publishers are merely getting less sueamish All that aside generally I’ll read a May Bird book or an Everlost title and they’ll be fun examinations of the hereafter but not the kind of things that touch my heart Great writing doesn’t have to transcend its genre It just has to be emotionally honest with the reader And The Graveyard Book is one of the most emotionally honest books I’ve yet to have read this year Smart and focused touching and wry it takes the story of a boy raised by ghosts and extends it beyond the restrictive borders of the setting Great stuffIt starts with three murders There were supposed to be four The man Jack was one of the best maybe THE best and how hard is it to kill a toddler anyway But on that particular night the little boy went for a midnight toddle out the front door while the murderer was busy and straight into the nearby graveyard Saved and protected by the denizens of that particular abode the ghosts and the far corporeal if mysterious Silas the little boy is called Bod short for Nobody because no one knows his name As he grows older Bod learns the secrets of the graveyard though he has to be careful The man or is it “men” who killed his family could come back for him Best to stay uiet and out of sight Yet as Bod grows older it becomes clear that hiding may not be the best way to confront his enemies And what’s Bod must come to grips with what it means to grow up Can I level with you You know Coraline Mr Gaiman’s previous foray into middle grade children’s literature Come close now I don’t want to speak too loudly Uh I didn’t much care for it WAIT Come back come back I didn’t mean it Well maybe I did a tad It was a nice book A sufficient story But it was very much new category alert an adult author to children’s author first timer title Gaiman appeared to be finding his sealegs with Coraline He took the old Alice in Wonderland trope which adult authors naturally gravitate to on their first tries see Un Lun Dun Summerland The King in the Window etc Throw in some rats bees and buttons and voila Instant success But Coraline for all its readability and charm didn’t get me here thumps chest I didn’t feel emotionally close to the material Now why it should be that I’d feel closer emotionally to a book filled with a plethora of ghosts ghouls night gaunts and Hounds of God I can only chalk up to The Graveyard Book's strong vision My husband likes to say that the whole reason Buffy the Vampire Slayer worked as a television show was that it was a natural metaphor for the high school and eventually college experience Likewise The Graveyard Book has this strongstrange wonderful metaphor about kids growing up learning about the wider world and exploring beyond the safe boundaries of their homes There's so much you can read into this book I mean aren’t all adults just ghosts to kids anyway Those funny talking people whose time has passed but that may provide some shelter and wisdom against the wider crueler world Plus Mr Gaiman also includes characters in Bod's world that kids will wish they had in their own Silas a man who may be a vampire though the word is never said is every child's fantasy; A mysteriousmagical guardianfriend who will tell you the truth when your parents will not One thing I particularly liked about the book was the fact that Bod makes uite a few careless or thoughtless mistakes and yet you don’t feel particularly inclined to throttle him because of them Too often in a work of fiction a person isn’t properly put into the head of their protagonist So when that character walks off and does something stupid there’s the sense sometimes faint sometimes not that they deserved it and you’re not going to stick around and read about somebody that dumb are you But even when Bod is at his most intolerable his most childishly selfish and single minded you can understand and sympathize with him Bod is no brat a fact that implies right there that he is someone worth rooting for We see our own young selves in Bod and we root for him as a result And as Bod reaches each stage in his growth he encounters experiences and personalities that help him to reach maturity That’s a lot to put on the plate of a l’il ole fantasy novel particularly one that’s appropriate for younger kids And it is appropriate too Don’t let the fact that the first sentence in the book “There was a hand in the darkness and it held a knife” put you off The murder of Bod’s family is swift immediate and off screen What remains is just a great fantasy novel that has the potential to appeal to both boy and girl readers Kid wants a ghost story Check Kid wants a fantasy novel set in another world appropriate for Harry Potter fans Check Kid wants a “good book” That’s my favorite reuest When the eleven year old comes up to my desk and begs for “a good book” I can just show them the cover and the title of this puppy and feel zero guilt when their little eyes light up A good book it is I guess that if I have any objections at all to the title it has something to do with the villains They’re a bit sketchy which I suppose is the point but we live in an era where children’s fantasy novels spend oodles of time defining their antagonists’ motivations and histories Gaiman’s interested in his hero which is natural but the villains’ raison d’être is just a bit too vague for the average reader Honestly if it weren’t for the fact that Bod’s family is slaughtered at the start of this tale you wouldn’t necessarily know whether or not to believe that these people are as nasty as we've been told That said the book’s a peach I once heard someone postulate that maybe Neil Gaiman wrote it just so that he could play with the sentence “It takes a graveyard to raise a child” Unlikely Fun but unlikely I mean he does make a casual allusion that isn’t far off from that phrase but he never goes whole hog This book doesn’t feel like it was written to back up a joke It feels like a book written by a parent with children growing up and moving out It’s a title that tips its hat to kids making their way in the world their pasts behind them their futures unknown This is not yet another silly little fantasy novel but something with weight and depth The fact that it just happens to be loads of fun to boot is simply a nice bonus Highly recommendedAges 10 and up

Epub ☆ The Graveyard Book ï Neil Gaiman

The Graveyard Book ´ Nobody Owens known to his friends as Bod is a perfectly normal boy Well he would be perfectly normal if he didn't live in a graveyard being raised and educated by ghosts with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living A 83% | Very Good Notes A bit too short and the illustrations don't really work Still it's a fun light and whimsical take on its macabre milieu Epub ☆ The Graveyard Book ï Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman ï The Graveyard Book Text

Neil Gaiman ï The Graveyard Book Text Is in the land of the living that real danger lurks for it is there that the man Jack lives and he has already killed Bod's familyA deliciously dark masterwork by bestselling author Neil Gaiman with illustrations by award winning Dave McKean When a family is murdered by a mysterious killer one of the intended victims is missing a young diapered boy who had wandered off just before the crime took place But the killer needed to complete the job Fortunately for the boy he was taken in by the late residents of a nearby graveyard And when the spirit of his newly deceased mother asks for their help the residents agree to raise her son He is given to the care of the Owens couple and named “Nobody” Bod for short as he looks like “nobody but himself” Neil Gaiman from The Verge In this Newbery Medal Carnegie Medal and Hugo Award winning novel it takes a graveyard to raise an actual corporate being and there are many who chip in Perhaps most important is Silas resident of the worlds of the dead and the living As Bod grows there are many interesting sorts who cross his path a young witch lacking a gravestone an unscrupulous dealer in antiues a snake like protector of a long dead master and an array of teachers And there must of course be a girl Scarlett by name a living girl Bod does venture out into the unprotected world beyond the graveyard gates not always with permission He wants to go to school like other kids and does with mixed results He wants to buy a headstone for a friend who lacks one He wants to spend time with Scarlett As he enters his teen years he determines to find the person who had killed his familyThis is not your usual coming of age story Bod is indeed a likeable kid good hearted innocent easy to care about One of Gaiman’s inspirations for this story was Kipling’s The Jungle Book with Bod as Mowgli and the graveyard residents substituting sometimes generically for their animal counterparts in the earlier work There is a section euivalent to Mowgli having been kidnapped by monkeys a werewolf might be Akela Bod’s nemesis is the killer Jack the Shere Khan of this tale Each chapter jumps in time and we see Bod take on new challenges as he ages Of course his home being a graveyard the challenges he faces are not pedestrian And finally he faces an adult mortal test that will define whether he actually gets to come of age or not There is so much in The Graveyard Book that is just flat out charming that you will find as I did that your lips keep curling up at the corners From Bod trying to find properly fitting clothing to struggling to learn some of the unusual skills the locals have mastered to coping with some of the lesser baddies who make life difficult for those around them Bod will gain your allegiance and your affection The baddie Jack is a purely dark sort No gray areas there And that makes the central conflict one of pretty much pure good against completely pure evil There are plenty of moments of real danger for Bod and that keeps tension high But there are nuances to other characters that add color and texture to what might otherwise have become a flat gray panel These additions add heft to the story and make one wonder larger thoughts about the limits of change of redemption This one is easy to recommend to kids of all ages but don’t wait too long You never know when it might beyou know too late PS – Disney has acuired the film rights for this and it is likely that it will emerge someday with a look similar to that of Coraline and The Nightmare Before ChristmasEXTRA STUFFLinks to the author’s personal Twitter FB and TumblrThe official website for the bookNeil Gaiman reads the entire bookThis Literary Wiki page seems rather slightI also reviewed Gaiman's Stardust briefly a few back The Ocean at the End of the Lane in August 2013 Trigger Warning in March 2015 The View From the Cheap Seats in June 2016