Review ã The Savage God: A Study of Suicide 102


Characters The Savage God: A Study of Suicide

Review ã The Savage God: A Study of Suicide 102 ↠ Después del suicidio de su admirada amiga la poeta Sylvia Plath y como una forma de entender su propia experiencia de suicida frustrado el ensayista crítico y poeta Al Alvarez recorre la historia de la autoaniuilación desde Roma hasta el psicoanálisis Observa el castigo social haTeratura ue puede significar muchas cosas un grito de ayuda desesperado un rechazo radical del mundo el mayor acto de libertad una confesión de fracaso Alvarez construye un estudio incomparable sobre un tema todavía poco pensado y sigue el hilo negro para proponer una nueva teoría del arte y sobre todo reflexionar vitalmen. 'An act like this' said Camus 'is prepared within the silence of the heart as is a great work of art' In The Savage God Al Álvarez examines suicide through a variety of lenses personal historical psychiatric philosophical cultural and literary The book contains a great deal of thought provoking material on a notoriously difficult subject It is well worth reading Álvarez begins by discussing Sylvia Plath’s life work and eventual suicide He then proceeds to look at suicide from a historical perspective The resulting overview of humanity’s complicated relationship with suicide is absolutely fascinating Of the various customs and attitudes he mentions in this section the following is particularly telling Even in the civilized Athens of Plato the suicide was buried outside the city and away from other graves; his self murdering hand was cut off and buried apart He goes on to investigate psychoanalytic theory’s treatment of suicide He also analyzes some of the reasons why suicide can be appealing on a purely emotional level Then Álvarez delves into suicide in literature Dante’s portrayal of the ghastly punishment reserved for suicides in The Inferno is briefly discussed; I’ve always found this imagery haunting when the soul violently tears itself from its own body it is thrown by Minos haphazardly into the terrible wood where it springs up like a grain of wheat and eventually grows into a thorn tree Then the harpies make their nests in its branches and tear at the leaves endlessly repeating the violence the soul had inflicted on itself At the Day of Judgment when bodies and souls are reunited the bodies of suicides will hang from the branches of these trees since divine justice will not bestow again on their owners the bodies they have wilfully thrown away Other authors he examines in this section include John Donne Robert Burton William Cowper Thomas Chatterton Goethe he focuses on The Sorrows of Young Werther’s impact in particular Coleridge Camus and Dostoevsky After discussing literature he concludes the book by sharing the story of his own suicide attemptThere are two areas in which I believe Álvarez’s analysis is especially incisive The first is his examination of the emotions mood and general mental state experienced by many suicidal individuals The book features numerous harrowing descriptions of this state of mind; notable among them are those of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Emily Dickinson These depictions powerfully convey the profound sense of apathy detachment and debilitating hopelessness which tends to lead to suicide Boris Pasternak describes this here uite well “But a man who decides to commit suicide puts a full stop to his being he turns his back on his past he declares himself a bankrupt and his memories to be unreal They can no longer help or save him he has put himself beyond their reach The continuity of his inner life is broken his personality is at an end And perhaps what finally makes him kill himself is not the firmness of his resolve but the unbearable uality of this anguish which belongs to no one of this suffering in the absence of the sufferer of this waiting which is empty because life has stopped and can no longer fill it” The second is Álvarez's insight into the relative futility of asking why an individual decides to kill himherself He explains how “no single theory will untangle an act as ambiguous and with such complex motives as suicide” Even an integrated approach one which incorporates several different theories will still fall short Suicide is by and large an intrinsically enigmatic act We can comprehend bits and pieces of the truth We can form a or less vague idea of the typical mindset involved But often even the suicidal individual is incapable of truly explaining it For “a suicide’s excuses are mostly by the way At best they assuage the guilt of the survivors soothe the tidy minded and encourage the sociologists in their endless search for convincing categories and theories They are like a trivial border incident which triggers off a major war The real motives which impel a man to take his own life are elsewhere; they belong to the internal world devious contradictory labyrinthine and mostly out of sight” Overall The Savage God illuminates many of the distinctive shades and hues that color “all that anguish the slow tensing of the self to that final irreversible act” I believe these fragmentary momentary glimpses are the best we can hope for in our struggle to fathom this ever elusive beast It is simply not possible to fully grasp the beast’s nature and perhaps that’s okay Is it not absurd to demand of the silence what by its very nature it is incapable of ever articulating –Édouard Manet’s Le Suicide

The Savage God A Study of SuicideTeratura ue puede significar muchas cosas un grito de ayuda desesperado un rechazo radical del mundo el mayor acto de libertad una confesión de fracaso Alvarez construye un estudio incomparable sobre un tema todavía poco pensado y sigue el hilo negro para proponer una nueva teoría del arte y sobre todo reflexionar vitalmen. 'An act like this' said Camus 'is prepared within the silence of the heart as is a great work of art' In The Savage God Al Álvarez examines suicide through a variety of lenses personal historical psychiatric philosophical cultural and literary The book contains a great deal of thought provoking material on a notoriously difficult subject It is well worth reading Álvarez begins by discussing Sylvia Plath’s life work and eventual suicide He then proceeds to look at suicide from a historical perspective The resulting overview of humanity’s complicated relationship with suicide is absolutely fascinating Of the various customs and attitudes he mentions in this section the following is particularly telling Even in the civilized Athens of Plato the suicide was buried outside the city and away from other graves; his self murdering hand was cut off and buried apart He goes on to investigate psychoanalytic theory’s treatment of suicide He also analyzes some of the reasons why suicide can be appealing on a purely emotional level Then Álvarez delves into suicide in literature Dante’s portrayal of the ghastly punishment reserved for suicides in The Inferno is briefly discussed; I’ve always found this imagery haunting when the soul violently tears itself from its own body it is thrown by Minos haphazardly into the terrible wood where it springs up like a grain of wheat and eventually grows into a thorn tree Then the harpies make their nests in its branches and tear at the leaves endlessly repeating the violence the soul had inflicted on itself At the Day of Judgment when bodies and souls are reunited the bodies of suicides will hang from the branches of these trees since divine justice will not bestow again on their owners the bodies they have wilfully thrown away Other authors he examines in this section include John Donne Robert Burton William Cowper Thomas Chatterton Goethe he focuses on The Sorrows of Young Werther’s impact in particular Coleridge Camus and Dostoevsky After discussing literature he concludes the book by sharing the story of his own suicide attemptThere are two areas in which I believe Álvarez’s analysis is especially incisive The first is his examination of the emotions mood and general mental state experienced by many suicidal individuals The book features numerous harrowing descriptions of this state of mind; notable among them are those of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Emily Dickinson These depictions powerfully convey the profound sense of apathy detachment and debilitating hopelessness which tends to lead to suicide Boris Pasternak describes this here uite well “But a man who decides to commit suicide puts a full stop to his being he turns his back on his past he declares himself a bankrupt and his memories to be unreal They can no longer help or save him he has put himself beyond their reach The continuity of his inner life is broken his personality is at an end And perhaps what finally makes him kill himself is not the firmness of his resolve but the unbearable uality of this anguish which belongs to no one of this suffering in the absence of the sufferer of this waiting which is empty because life has stopped and can no longer fill it” The second is Álvarez's insight into the relative futility of asking why an individual decides to kill himherself He explains how “no single theory will untangle an act as ambiguous and with such complex motives as suicide” Even an integrated approach one which incorporates several different theories will still fall short Suicide is by and large an intrinsically enigmatic act We can comprehend bits and pieces of the truth We can form a or less vague idea of the typical mindset involved But often even the suicidal individual is incapable of truly explaining it For “a suicide’s excuses are mostly by the way At best they assuage the guilt of the survivors soothe the tidy minded and encourage the sociologists in their endless search for convincing categories and theories They are like a trivial border incident which triggers off a major war The real motives which impel a man to take his own life are elsewhere; they belong to the internal world devious contradictory labyrinthine and mostly out of sight” Overall The Savage God illuminates many of the distinctive shades and hues that color “all that anguish the slow tensing of the self to that final irreversible act” I believe these fragmentary momentary glimpses are the best we can hope for in our struggle to fathom this ever elusive beast It is simply not possible to fully grasp the beast’s nature and perhaps that’s okay Is it not absurd to demand of the silence what by its very nature it is incapable of ever articulating –Édouard Manet’s Le Suicide

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The Savage God: A Study of Suicide Ì Después del suicidio de su admirada amiga la poeta Sylvia Plath y como una forma de entender su propia experiencia de suicida frustrado el ensayista crítico y poeta Al Alvarez recorre la historia de la autoaniuilación desde Roma hasta el psicoanálisis Observa el castigo social hacia el suicida y muestra a través de la li. If you're into stuff like this you can read the full reviewPlath “The Savage God A Study of Suicide” by Al AlvarezOriginal Review 2002“Suicide is after all the result of a choice However impulsive the action and confused the motives at the moment when a man finally decides to take his own life he achieves a certain temporary clarity Suicide may be a declaration of bankruptcy which passes judgment on a life as one long history of failure But it is a decision which by its very finality is not wholly a failure There is I believe a whole class of suicides who take their own lives not in order to die but to escape confusion to clear their heads They deliberately use suicide to create an unencumbered reality for themselves or to break through the patterns of obsession and necessity which they have unwittingly imposed on their lives”In “The Savage God A Study of Suicide” by Al Alvarez Download ☆ PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free à Al Álvarez

Al Álvarez à 2 Read

Al Álvarez à 2 Read Te sobre las fuerzas oscuras ue nos acechan“Los elocuentes ensayos de Alvarez son ricos en anécdotas y están escritos por la mano de un verdadero cultor de la poesía ue ha dedicado su vida a ella” JM Coetzee “Al Alvarez es el hombre más caballeroso y amable ue ustedes o yo jamás podríamos conocer” John Le Carré. What shelf do you put a literary approach to suicide on Any way have put it in 'spirit' Good overview of historical attitides to suicide psych etc and very personal on the death of his friend Sylvia Plath and his own attempted suicide Have read it a few times and if I had a suicide shelf would have this as a key text Suicide as in to do with existentialism rather than depression by the way the sort of 'can't take any ' 'I will punish you' acts of suicide important of course but part only of a much bigger and fascinating set of uestions As the Hamlet boy said