ePub ☆ mobi Om høsten ñ ½ Karl Ove Knausgård

Karl Ove Knausgård Ä Om høsten mobi

ePub ☆ mobi Om høsten ñ ½ Karl Ove Knausgård ½ A love letter to his unborn daughter Autumn is for every reader who thinks about what the world holds for their child and is the first book in a surprising deeply personal and humane uartet The Seasons the new project from the always fascinating original global lA love letter to his unborn daughter Autumn is for every reader who thinks about what the world holds for their child and is the first book in a surprising deeply personal and humane uartet The Seasons the new project from the always fascinating original global literary superstar 28 August Now as I write this you know nothing about anything about what awaits you the kind of world you will be born into And I know nothing about you I want to show you our w I loved this work a huge departure from the maximalist inward peering sprawl of MY STRUGGLE whose uality has been sadly lost in the Sturm und Drang that has surrounded Knausgaard’s rise to fame He has always been an extraordinarily good line level writer except for his notoriously horrendous dialogue which is totally absent here The concept lets him hone in on his strength of observation these are the first 90 or so entries in a string of 1 2 page descriptions for his unborn daughter The other 3 collections are still to come He wrote one essay a day for a year and each is on one word My 8 favorites are “Apples” “Teeth” “Piss” “Adders” “Beds” Tin Cans” “Flies” and “Ambulances”I’ve seen some complaints about this concept being basically a writing exercise blown out but what writing ISN’T a writing exercise blown out? As an experiment I taught my favorites to my Rutgers students this week then asked them to each choose a subject of their own and write a uick Knausgaardy essay I say without exaggeration that it led to the best student writing I’ve ever seen which is particularly remarkable this early in a semester I think this is testament to the power of the concept Because there is a beautiful turn in many of these essays toward the personal – look at this amazing ending to “Adders” mild spoilers which comes after a fairly simple general description of their deafness“The adder winds its way emerges from the stunted woods onto the upper part of a pebble beach a hundred metres or so above the sea where it encounters a large slab of stone and remains there A man and a boy come walking and because of the pebbles it doesn’t notice them The man stops points out the adder to the boy bends down and throes a rock which strikes the adder’s middle It slinks away is struck by another rock and another It writhes and wriggles as little by little it is covered in rocks But there are spaces between the rocks and it slithers through them When the head pokes out from the pile the man is standing only a yard away and the stone that strikes its flat head crushes itMore than forty years have passed since that happened I still wish he hadn’t done it and I still don’t understand why he did but he seemed to hate it than any other thing I had never seen him like that before and never saw him like that again”Readers of MY STRUGGLE familiar with the father will likely thrill at the way he leaks into the text here This book with its deep borderline repetitive obsession with the primordial also has a great deal in common with the hugely underread A TIME FOR EVERYTHING There are differences of course – the translator is a poet and as Knausgaard said in an interview in Brooklyn last week the work is infused with her poetic language But the exclamations the pivots into sensual in the literal sense experience or memory the eye – it’s all here condensed approachable It is all very Lydia DavisThis is why I take great issue with Kevin Kelsey’s review of this why I’ve spent a bit of extra time The subject matter here leaves a lot to be desired? The subject matter is life itself

pdf ✓ Ä Karl Ove Knausgård

Orld as it is now the door the floor the water tap and the sink the garden chair close to the wall beneath the kitchen window the sun the water the trees You will come to see it in your own way you will experience things for yourself and live a life of your own so of course it is primarily for my own sake that I am doing this showing you the world little one makes my life worth living Autumn begins with a letter Karl Ove writes to his unborn daughter sho Probably a better introduction to Knausgaard than My Struggle Book One especially for those with shorter attention spans or daily subway rides and certainly easier reading than A Time for Everything Like his excellent and comparatively very much under read exchange of letters with another writer about the World Cup in Brazil Home and Away Writing the Beautiful Game this suirms with life Suirmy perceptions of life all around the author are contained by the overall volume with the seasonal title sections named for each month and each section preceded by an explicit letter to his unborn fourth child a daughter to whom it seems like all the chapters are addressed although it's really specifically just those letters introducing each month In no way is this a book about autumn; it's not his take on Keats's To Autumn and seasons of mist and mellow fruitfulness close bosom friend of the maturing sun type stuff It's not even really about the chapter titles apples plastic bags frogs beekeeping blood daguerrotype jellyfish labia badgers Van Gogh faces Flaubert vomit toilet bowls chimneys silence drums or eyes that's a random selection of about 20% of the short bits in this It's about how the author's perception when turned on anything eeks out an essence that relates to an amphibian type permeability between this and that between the personal and the social sphere a great bit about how the Thermos can be used anywhere except in someone else's house since it's an extension of one's home and using it in someone else's sitting room is a sort of incursion between inside of the body and outside it the mouth the labia the anus between heaven and earth lightning between the present and the past between reality and its representation in art And yet some reviews on here call this pointless It's filled with points with several points per page all sorts of calmly elegantly presented insights and impressions of the world All the one and two star reviews on here make me love this project since it confounds or seems blase to readers with underdeveloped associative intelligence I don't think knowledge of the author's history is necessary but it helped me see the world he effortlessly evokes Feels less like a creative writing exercise as some on here have said than meditations like those in Kafka's Blue Octavo Notebooks or Roland Barthes's Mythologies short essays on wrestling for example mixed with autobiographical bits about the author's family in Sweden growing up in Norway raising a family of three kids with a fourth on the way A great read for me that really hits the literary sweet spot in that it's about the experience of existence like Life A User's Manual it's simply about life and its arbitrary yet totally organic structure barely contains its vitality that is lets the life in each section brim over the edges and conceal the light yet not loose structure The prose is a little tighter than in My Struggle a little carefully composed but not in any way does it feel overworked it always feels natural to me casual yet attentive loose yet not sloppy and each section for the most part nails its ending At times I did sense that the translator was someone else but the same KOK spirit was still conveyed Excited for Winter to come in January 2018 and then Spring and Summer The overall project in a single volume or a paperback boxed set could prove to be My Struggle's eual yet in many ways its opposite

reader Om høsten

Om høstenWing her what to expect of the world she will soon come into He writes one short piece per day describing the material and natural world with the precision and mesmerizing intensity that have become his trademark a riveting personal encyclopedia of everything from chewing gum and tin cans to the migration of birds and the stars Through close observation of the objects and phenomena around him Karl Ove shows us how vast unknowable and wondrous the world i Karl Ove Knausgard is always playing with form and autobiography I saw one blurb that described this as a personal encyclopedia It comes closest to Annie Dillard in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek where she writes about the seasons and other observations that come from a mind that takes the time to observe I feel they are kindred spirits in some ways but Karl takes pleasure from bodily fluids than Annie ever would This is the first of a cycle of similar writings and because of the place and time he is in while he writes he addresses some letters to his unborn daughter There are sections named after the months in the autumn but not everything necessarily relates to autumn except he's having those thoughts during that time It made me want to wander the autumn leaves of Norway crunching on thin skinned apples and watching the repeated sunrise My two favorites were Autumn Leaves and Silence and I wasn't too keen on Piss or Vomit but that's me I'll keep reading this series because they are much uicker than My Struggle but I'd also like to get back to that