Read ☆ A Place to Belong 104

characters ☆ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ↠ Cynthia Kadohata

A Place to BelongA Japanese American family reeling from their ill treatment in the Japanese internment camps gives up their American citizenship to move back to Hiroshima unaware of the devastation wreaked by the atomic bomb in this piercing look at the aftermath of World War II by Newbery Medalist Cynthia KadohataWorld War II has ended but while America has won the war twelve year old Hanako feels lost To her the world and her world seems irrevocably broken America the only home she’s ever known imprisoned then rejected her and her family and thousands. What stood out to meThis was a different twist on historical fiction about the round up of Japanese Americans during WW2 This family had to deal with the aftermath of the destruction of the atomic bombs dropped on Japan after they have been “repatriated”I think this would be an excellent tool for middle grade teachers to use in lessons about Japanese internment

Cynthia Kadohata ↠ 4 Summary

On the streets but how can Hanako help them when there is not even enough food for her own brother Hanako feels she could crack under the pressure but just because something is broken doesn’t mean it can’t be fixed Cracks can make room for gold her grandfather explains when he tells her about the tradition of kintsukuroi fixing broken objects with gold lacuer making them stronger and beautiful than ever As she struggles to adjust to find her place in a new world Hanako will find that the gold can come in many forms and family may be her. Five stars for being a book like no other I've ever read Five stars for an unflinching portrayal of the human level destruction the American government caused in the lives of Japanese Americans duringafter WWII This was not an easy book to read This part of American history is so very shameful I admire Cynthia Kadohata for trusting me to infer the meaning of the Japanese words she used and then remember them the next time but I really wished for a glossary I could notcannot wrap my head around the Japanese world view portrayed in the bookbut that's exactly why we need books that are windows

characters A Place to Belong

Read ☆ A Place to Belong 104 ☆ A Japanese American family reeling from their ill treatment in the Japanese internment camps gives up their American citizenship to move back to Hiroshima unaware of the devastation wreaked by the atomic bomb in this piercing look at the aftermath of World War II by Newbery Medalist Cynthia KadohataWorld War II has endOf other innocent Americans because of their Japanese heritage because Japan had bombed Pearl Harbor Hawaii Japan the country they’ve been forced to move to the country they hope will be the family’s saving grace where they were supposed to start new and better lives is in shambles because America dropped bombs of their own one on Hiroshima unlike any other in history And Hanako’s grandparents live in a small village just outside the ravaged city The country is starving the black markets run rampant and countless orphans beg for food. Listened to audiobook I surprise myself with this rating because I found the beginning terribly slow and hard to get into Several times when I had time to listen I chose to do something else because this felt like such a slog I had really enjoyed Kadohata's previous book Checked In that book the presentation of all the little details felt consistent with Conor's personality and interests In this 3rd person book the same piling on just felt like author's inconsiderateness I don't really care how an iron works and it didn't seem important to the story to tell me That being said Kadohata is a very good writer and once the book settles into the family's life in Japan this felt like a very good book The experience for me seemed thus similar to Warga's Other Words for Home The back scratching scene is probably one of the most memorable of the year in children's literature