Notes from an Apocalypse Download À 2

Review Notes from an Apocalypse

Notes from an Apocalypse Download À 2 ´ By the author of the award winning To Be a Machine an absorbing deeply felt book about our anxious present tense and coming to grips with the futureWe're alive in a time of worst case scenarios The weather has gone uncanny Our old postwar alliances are crumbling Everywhere you look there's an omen a jokeIve through the worst And what on Earth is anybody doing about itDublin based writer Mark O'Connell is consumed by these uestions and as the father of two young children himself he finds them increasingly urgent In Notes from an Apocalypse he crosses the globe in pursuit of answers He tours survival bunkers in South Dakota He ventures to New Zealand a favored retreat of billionaires banking on civilization's collapse He engages with would be Mars colonists preppers right wing conspiracists And he bear. Note I received an ARC of this book courtesy of NetGalleyConsidering just how much anxiety I feel about these present times in general I was surprised by just how much I ended up enjoying Notes from an Apocalypse O’Connell’s various tours to explore how different groups and people are preparing for the possible end is done so with both a critical eye and also a great deal of wit Yet as he journeys about and makes his sharp observations there’s always the constant undercurrent of his own very strong and very open fears about what the future brings often to the point where he cannot help but empathize at times with his subjects even when he finds them to be otherwise ridiculous in so many ways It’s this honesty about his personal journey to try and reconcile himself with what lies ahead that turns a just a genuinely interesting book into a strangely therapeutic work that I think many anxious people this reader included can and will very much appreciate

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By the author of the award winning To Be a Machine an absorbing deeply felt book about our anxious present tense and coming to grips with the futureWe're alive in a time of worst case scenarios The weather has gone uncanny Our old postwar alliances are crumbling Everywhere you look there's an omen a joke whose punchline is the end of the world How is a person supposed to live in the shadow of such a grim future What does it mean to have children nothing if not an act of hope What might it be like to l. Mark O'Connell strikes me as an anxious person Global problems prey on his mind none than the crisis of climate change He watches YouTube videos of scrawny polar bears scrambling for scraps of food and it fills him with terror The end of the world is imminent he thinks So he decides to investigate people who have already accepted this fact to see if their resigned outlook can provide him with some kind of comfortHe attends a Mars convention in California to meet those who have decided that Earth is doomed and that the Red Planet poses our best chance of survival He travels to Auckland to survey the recently acuired estate of Peter Thiel the billionaire who believes that New Zealand is the ideal location to ride out the apocalypse In Chernobyl he walks around the wreckage of the 1986 nuclear catastrophe with other so called disaster tourists to experience what the end of the world might actually look likeO'Connell is uite a witty narrator and though he is consumed by anxiety he has a knack of exposing the funny side of the unusual circumstances he finds himself in He reminds me of Jon Ronson in this respect He's also a thoughtful and compassionate writer I particularly admired the final chapter of this book where he talks about his two young children He describes his fear of bringing them into this dying world worrying if it is an inconsiderate and irresponsible thing to do But he sees the utter joy they both exude the little things like singing in the car or a beautiful sunset that fill these two small humans with happiness and their ecstasy in being alive makes him feel like he has done the right thingMaybe the writing is a bit overwrought at times and a few of O'Connell's references went over my head But this is a humorous thought provoking and poignant examination of what the end of the world could mean It might sound like it's all doom and gloom but if anything I found its ultimate sentiment to be life affirming

Mark OConnell ☆ 2 Free read

Notes from an ApocalypseS witness to those places like Chernobyl that the future has already visited real life portraits of the end of the world as we know it In doing so he comes to a resolution while offering readers a uniue window into our contemporary imaginationBoth investigative and deeply personal Notes from an Apocalypse is an affecting humorous and surprisingly hopeful meditation on our present moment With insight humanity and wit O'Connell leaves you to wonder What if the end of the world isn't the end of the world. I didn’t think it was possible to read about the coming apocalypse and be bored The author is very philosophical and examines ways to deal with his fear of the future and guilt for bringing children into the world He has chapters on bunkers in South Dakota estates in New Zealand trips to Mars desolate corners of England and touring Chernobyl But I was so bored that even Chernobyl seemed fun The only point I realized is that I need way money to survive in the future