In the Name of Rome The Men Who Won the Roman Empire Ebook Ý 480 pages Õ Reflectionslisburnltd

Book In the Name of Rome The Men Who Won the Roman Empire

In the Name of Rome The Men Who Won the Roman Empire Ebook Ý 480 pages Õ Reflectionslisburnltd ß The complete and definitive history of how Roman generals carved out the greatest and longest lasting empire the world has ever seenThe Roman army was one of the most effective fiK by the author of THE PUNIC WARS concentrates on those Roman generals who displayed exceptional gifts of leadership and who won the greatest victories With 26 chapters covering the entire span of the Roman Empire it is a complete history of Roman warfar A fantastic read Well informed and interesting throughout this examination of the Roman military machine as seen through the lives of its most famous generals is well worthy of further examinationHighly recommended

Adrian Goldsworthy Õ In the Name of Rome The Men Who Won the Roman Empire Epub

The complete and definitive history of how Roman generals carved out the greatest and longest lasting empire the world has ever seenThe Roman army was one of the most effective fighting forces in history The legions and their commanders carved out an emp Goldsworthy successfully draws a picture of how Roman generals actually commanded their armies This book is in similar style to Goldworthy's first book The Roman Army at War which covers how the Roman Army actually fought its battlesBesides the story of individual generals this book also traces the development of the Roman style of command as it evolved along with changing Roman society The story starts with Fabius Maximus and Claudius Marcellus who are elected leaders of citizen soldiers in the Second Punic War and ends with Belisarius a member of the Imperial household who is general of an army of unruly mercenary cavalry and uestionable infantry A definite Roman style of command emerges which Goldsworthy then follows past the end of the Roman world and into modern times through leaders like Gustavus Adolphus du Pic and especially NapoleonThe main Roman leaders covered in the book areFabius Maximus 2nd Punic WarClaudius Marcellus 2nd Punic WarScipio Africanus 2nd Punic WarAemilius Paullus Conuest of MacedoniaScipio Aemilianus NumantiaGaius Marius Jugurthine War Cimbri Teutonesuintus Sertorius Roman Civil war in SpainPompey the Great Conuest of the EastJulius Caesar Conuest of GaulThere is also a chapter on Pompey vs Caesar in the Civil WarGermanicus Caesar Reprisal war across the Rhine after defeat of VarusDomitius Corbulo Armenian WarTitus Vespasianus Siege of JerusalemEmperor Trajan Dacian WarsEmperor Julian Career on the Rhine and in ParthiaBelisarius Persian Wars Battle of DaraGoldsworthy also manages to work in many other prominent Roman generals such as Sulla Lucullus Agrippa and Paulinus SeutoniusIf you are interested in military leadership ancient military history or Roman history in general you should read this book

Text Ê In the Name of Rome The Men Who Won the Roman Empire Õ Adrian Goldsworthy

In the Name of Rome The Men Who Won the Roman EmpireIre which eventually included the greater part of the known world This was thanks largely to the generals who led the Roman army to victory after victory and whose strategic and tactical decisions shaped the course of several centuries of warfareThis boo well written as is Goldsworthy's forte but his selection is 90% predictable who's who of Roman generals with a heavy slice of the 2nd century BC AD He makes his most interesting point in the intro Despite the apparent amateurism of the Roman high command with no academies little formal on the job training except as a tribune there was an unofficial streak of imparted wisdom through lost manuals senior advisors with campaigns under their belt let's not forget the senior centurions of a Legion with up to thirty years' experience in various theaters of war Also the education of Roman nobility where politics military glory were inseparately entwined gave a decent foundation for a young general to command on horseback with sangfroid As in any profession since the damn of man the most important uality was to listen to learn from mistakes to delegate Even if Caesar knew how to time a personal encouragement by appearing at a threatened section of the frontline The luxury of pre gunpowder warfare