The Last Days of Richard III Summary É 107

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The Last Days of Richard III Summary É 107 í What Richard III did in his last five months what happened to his body and how his DNA was found in Canada A new and uniuely detailed exploration of Richard’s last 150 days explores these events from the standpoint of Richard himself and his contemporaries By deliberately avoiding the hindsWhat Richard III did in his last five months what happened to his body and how his DNA was found in Canada A new and uniuely detailed exploration of Richard’s last 150 days explores these events from the standpoint of Richard himself and his contemporaries By deliberately avoiding the hindsight knowledge that he will lose the Battle of. The idea of looking at the last days of Richard III's life as if the battle of Bosworth's outcome was unknown seems so obvious to me that I'm wondering why it wasn't done before It's only a literary text that can plant portents and a sense of fatalism in Richard III's story as this book shows he expected to win at Bosworth and he was a man of considerable piety and courage The version of Richard III shown in Shakespeare's plays as elsewhere of course is a part of the Tudor myth no surprise to those who've looked at the history plays in any detail I thinkGranted the scope of this book is deliberately limited Such infamous issues as the 'Princes in the tower' are barely touched upon and Ashdown Hill is wholly on the side of Richard III viewing Henry Tudor's claims as dubious in the extreme But to his credit Ashdown Hill makes that explicitly clear and points out several instances of double standards applied to that period of history by writers both contemporary and modernThe first section of the book up to Richard III's death is the fascinating to me Genealogy is not one of my things and even if I personally were a descendant of someone important say Llywelyn ap Gruffydd or Owain Glyndŵr I'd find it difficult to be interested in the exact doings of all the unbroken line from that person to me So the chapter tracing the female line of Richard's family was one I skimmed though I was fascinated to know that it was done and that the mitochondrial DNA survived for comparison with the body now known to be Richard III'sThe success of the search for Richard's body and the comparison with a living descendent speaks very well of Ashdown Hill's meticulous and accurate research

John Ashdown-Hill ✓ 7 Free read

Bosworth Field this book presents a new Richard no passive victim awaiting defeat and death but a king actively pursuing his own policies and agenda It also reexamines the aftermath of Bosworth the treatment of Richard’s body his burial and the construction of his tomb Based on newly discovered evidence and wider insights it explore. An interesting account of the last few months of the life and reign of Richard III John Ashdown Hill makes the important point that although this time is generally regarded as unimportant except as the lead up to the battle of Bosworth King Richard did not know he would be killed Although Henry Tudor was a threat he probably didn't see him as a huge threat of a minor irritation Richard expected to defeat him and spent these months busily planning the rest of his life and his reign New legislations were brought before parliament The prospect of marrying again was being discussed For Richard this time was filled with possibilities and new beginnings and this book takes a fresh look at what occurred

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The Last Days of Richard IIIS the motives underlying these events And there is the fascinating story of why and how Richard III’s DNA was rediscovered alive and well and living in Canada This is a stimulating and thought provoking account of the end of Richard’s life even readers very familiar with his short life will discover a new and fascinating picture of him. This is only a fairly short book with a limited focus but nevertheless I found it very interesting It's odd really because opinion on the subject tends to be so polarised that it's easy to lose sight of a few simple facts and some of what Ashdown Hill presents here should really be so obvious For starters for all the association of Bosworth with Richard III he didn't know it was going to happen and obviously didn't go in 'knowing' that he was going to be defeated hindsight may be a great thing but not if you want to look at historical events in contextThe Portuguese marriage proposals was something that I did know about but here it's presented so logically it makes absolute sense The chosen bride was a princes of Portugal with a Spanish Infanta also in the playing as a reserve option Both of these princesses were descended from the legitimate and senior branch of the House of Lancaster Further it seems that a Portuguese marriage was also in the offing for Elizabeth of York That being so the letter supposedly written by her reported by Buck but now seemingly lost makes sense as does the confusion over Richard II wanting to marry Elizabeth his niece which never made any real sort of sense as if we accept the truth of the Eleanor Butler pre contract then the children of Edward IV by Elizabeth Woodville were undoubtedly illegitimate so there would be absolutely no point in Richard marrying her On the other hand Elizabeth and her sisters were the closest things available to Royal Princesses to be traded on the dynastic marriage market